This Small Gadget Safely Stores a Face Mask in Your Car

Elroy Mariano

We live difficult times, there’s no doubt about it, and in the last six months or so, each and every one of us just had to adapt to a completely different lifestyle that changed pretty much everything we do. Including our relationship with cars, that is, as for some reason, […]

We live difficult times, there’s no doubt about it, and in the last six months or so, each and every one of us just had to adapt to a completely different lifestyle that changed pretty much everything we do.

Including our relationship with cars, that is, as for some reason, face masks have become the new car air freshener because way too many drivers believe just hanging them to the mirror is okay.

As a side note, it really isn’t, especially because face masks should be stored in safe places where they can’t be exposed to any kinds of contaminants or even worse, where they can spread any potential virus that’s already attached to its filters.

This is a problem that a new device called Car Case4Mask wants to resolve, as it proposes a new approach to safely store a mask inside a car.

More specifically, this is a case where you can just keep your mask, used or new, thus making sure that no microorganism ends up in a place where it shouldn’t be.

According to the official description of the product, it’s made of a new material that “deactivates many microorganisms so they can not survive and reproduce on it.” It has reportedly already proven effective against over 100 strains of virus in 22 viral families, including the one we’re fighting nowadays, 400 strains of bacteria, and 60 strains of fungi and yeast.

The case can be installed in your car right on the console, and it features four different adapters to stay in place, including a sticker, an air vent holder, a clip, and a suction cup.

This new gadget will soon go live for crowdfunding support on Indiegogo, and if it receives the necessary funds from people all over the world, it should enter the mass-production stages in the coming months.

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