“Technical issues, internet speed,” among many challenges for virtual learning students

Elroy Mariano

ABC 7 News is taking you inside the home of a local Amarillo family, a mother with a full-time job and her two kids who go to Amarillo ISD and have chosen virtual learning amid the coronavirus pandemic. ABC 7 crews arrived at their house at 7 a.m. to get […]

ABC 7 News is taking you inside the home of a local Amarillo family, a mother with a full-time job and her two kids who go to Amarillo ISD and have chosen virtual learning amid the coronavirus pandemic.

ABC 7 crews arrived at their house at 7 a.m. to get a sense of how a day in the life of virtual learning students looks like.

Classes begin at 8:05 a.m. The only difference is that learning happens at home. 

Matthew Cardenas and Diego Venzor log in to Canvas, an online learning database, every morning.

“And then before that, I take a shower, eat something, wash my face and brush my teeth,” said Venzor who is a 14-year old 9th grader at Tascosa High School.

“It’s kind of like the same thing every day,” said Cardenas who is an 11-year old 6th grader at Austin Middle School. He says math is the hardest subject for him. “To know what to do and to know what to do next and what would I do with the problem? Like how do I solve it?”

His brother Diego says the hardest subject for him is Biology. He says he’s still getting used to not seeing his teachers face-to-face.

“In science sometimes we have to do projects, and we won’t be there for it,” he said.

Rubi Venzor is Diego and Matthew’s mother. She’s also a pharmacy tech. She’s seen how quickly people around her have been infected by COVID.

“My main concern was their health, although education is my priority for my boys, I didn’t want them to feel anxiety or always trying to watch around their surrounding just because of COVID,” she said.

When it comes to virtual learning with her kids—there have been some challenges.

“The technical issues, the main one, the speed of the internet’s been slow, they don’t get to see their teacher every day, that interaction is not as personal,” Venzor said.

But she says, it has been reassuring to know her kids have access to their teachers via Zoom.

“The only thing I feel is hard this year, just because they’re both going to a new school. So, my oldest was going to high school, a freshman and my youngest sixth grade. So they’re missing those milestones,” said Venzor.

Diego takes the initiative to help his brother and mom says that’s a big challenge for somebody that’s 14. She tells ABC 7 News overall, she’s proud of her two boys.

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